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Mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle

USS Cyclops, 1918

Also know as the Devil’s Triangle, the large expanse of sea covering 440,000 miles is part of a busy shipping route that vessels travelling towards the Americas, Europe and the Caribbean use often

The sea has always been mysterious and dangerous, even more so when there are known disappearances within a certain area. During the age of discovery, Christopher Columbus reportedly witnessed a flame of fire crashing into the sea, particularly into the region of the Bermuda Triangle. Although no one knew if this was true, stories about something odd in the area started spreading. And while tales were spread, no one really paid close attention to the eeriness of the place.

That was, until the mysterious disappearance of the US Navy’s cargo vessel USS Cyclops. The vessel had been carrying 10,800 tons of manganese ore with about 309 crew members. It left the port of Brazil, sending out its one and only message of its safe departure, only to never be heard of again. Search teams had been put together to try to locate the vessel, but with no clue or distress signal from the vessel, it was like searching a needle in a haystack. Bearing in mind, the incident happened in 1918, so technologies were not as advanced as today.

Just about 37 years prior to the disappearance of the USS Cyclops, another ship experienced an unworldly episode in the area as well. In 1881, the 210-feet American schooner Ellen Austin chanced upon an unnamed ship drifting aimlessly. It was unmanned, and all its crew were missing. The Captain of the Ellen Austin, Captain Baker, instructed his crew to observe the ship for two days before sending salvage crew on board. There, they found well-packed shipment of mahogany, personal belongings and food rations. Except, the Captain’s logbook and nameplate was nowhere to be found.

Hoping to tow the ship back, Captain Baker ordered his salvage crew to guide the ship to follow Ellen Austin. However, after the ships were separated by a sea storm, it disappeared. Strangely, that same unknown ship appeared before Captain Baker and his crew again. This time, the entire crew vanished as well.

More recently, in 2015, the 790-feet cargo vessel SS El Faro departed the port of Jacksonville, USA for Puerto Rico with 33 seafarers on board. It had been carrying containers, trailers and vehicles for shipment when it met with a tropical storm one day after its departure. The last communication from the captain reported the failure of the main engine, a power outage and a tilting of the vessel by 15 degrees. After that, silence reigned. A massive search was organized, and when found, the vessel was sitting upright about 15,000-feet on the seabed of the Atlantic. Obviously, none of its crew were ever found.

 

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